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Fingal O'Reilly, Irish Doctor Fans of Taylor’s bestselling Irish Country novels know Dr. Fingal Flahertie O’Reilly as the irascible senior partner of a general practice in the colorful Irish village of Ballybucklebo. Newly married to his once long-lost sweetheart, he’s ready to settle into domestic bliss, but there’s always something requiring his attention, be it a riding accident, a difficult patient Fans of Taylor’s bestselling Irish Country novels know Dr. Fingal Flahertie O’Reilly as the irascible senior partner of a general practice in the colorful Irish village of Ballybucklebo. Newly married to his once long-lost sweetheart, he’s ready to settle into domestic bliss, but there’s always something requiring his attention, be it a riding accident, a difficult patient with a worrisome heart condition, a spot of grouse-hunting, or even some tricky shenanigans at the local dog races. The everyday complications of village life are very different from the challenges Fingal faced nearly thirty years earlier, when fresh out of medical school, the young Dr. O’Reilly accepts a post at the Aungier Street Dispensary, tending to the impoverished denizens of Dublin’s tenement slums. Yet even as he tries to make a difference, Fingal’s tireless devotion to his patients may cost him his own true love…. Shifting back and forth between the present and the past, Patrick Taylor’s captivating Fingal O'Reilly, Irish Doctor, brings to life both the green young man O’Reilly once was and the canny village doctor readers have come to know and admire. At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.

30 review for Fingal O'Reilly, Irish Doctor

  1. 3 out of 5

    Jean

    I enjoyed the Irish Doctor series and thought it was finished a number of years ago. I was pleasantly surprised to discover it is still on going. This book is the first one out after I had stop reading the series. In this book the author flashes back and forth between the past and present of O’Reilly’s life. Taylor goes back to O’Reilly’s early days just after graduating from medical school. In 1936, he goes to work in the Dublin tenements in a street dispensary (medical clinic). It is here we m I enjoyed the Irish Doctor series and thought it was finished a number of years ago. I was pleasantly surprised to discover it is still on going. This book is the first one out after I had stop reading the series. In this book the author flashes back and forth between the past and present of O’Reilly’s life. Taylor goes back to O’Reilly’s early days just after graduating from medical school. In 1936, he goes to work in the Dublin tenements in a street dispensary (medical clinic). It is here we meet nurse Kitty O’Halloran as they are dating. Then Taylor flashed forward to when Kitty and Fingal are married and he is a senior partner in a practice in Ballybucklebo in Northern Ireland. O’Reilly has hired a woman physician and some of the patients are balking at seeing a woman. If I remember from the other books, the series ranges in time from late 1920s to late 1950s. I found the section where O’Reilly is participating in a research project with sulfur drugs most interesting. The book is well written. The characters are unforgettable and Fingal is getting grumpy as he ages. The house keeper Kinky is a delight. The book is ideal for an audio book because of the various Irish accents and words. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is almost seventeen hours long. John Keating does a superb job narrating the book. Keating is an actor and an award -winning audiobook narrator.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    It has been awhile since my last visit to Ballybucklebo, and being there again was lovely. This book hops back and forth between Fingal in his current life and Fingal as a new doctor working in the slums of Dublin. The transitions are handled smoothly, with each trip to the past instigated by something that is happening in the present. In the portions that take place in Dublin, Fingal has taken a post as a GP (general practitioner), helping an older doctor in the Liberties section of Dublin. The It has been awhile since my last visit to Ballybucklebo, and being there again was lovely. This book hops back and forth between Fingal in his current life and Fingal as a new doctor working in the slums of Dublin. The transitions are handled smoothly, with each trip to the past instigated by something that is happening in the present. In the portions that take place in Dublin, Fingal has taken a post as a GP (general practitioner), helping an older doctor in the Liberties section of Dublin. The poverty and disease there are terrible and Fingal feels a calling to help alleviate as much as he can. As we have seen in previous books, Fingal's personality is such that he gets deeply involved in the lives of his patients. I loved the way that each one was brought to life, making me feel as if I were standing right at his elbow watching what happens. Fingal also stays close to his medical school friends, which include fun times and also times of great intensity. There are also some interesting bits of medical history slipped in, such as the development of antibiotics and the enormous difference they make, and the later advances in cardiology, such as the invention of the portable defibrillator. On a personal side, Fingal's romance with Kitty continues, but it isn't all smooth sailing. In the end, we finally find out what parted them for so many years. Back in Ballbucklobo, Fingal and Kitty are back from their honeymoon and settling into married life. It's really sweet to see how happy they are together. Fingal is settling back into his practice after being away on his honeymoon, and catching up on the lives of his patients and neighbors. Besides the day to day illnesses, there are a few more intense moments. A riding accident that causes a broken leg, a mysterious chest pain, and heart trouble for our irascible councilman bring a bit of excitement to the practice. While Dr. Barry Laverty is away, studying to be an OB/GYN, Fingal has a temporary doctor helping out. She's a lovely young lady doctor, which has some of the residents pretty stirred up. It's a reminder that female doctors were few and far between, and not always readily accepted. I enjoyed seeing Jenny win people over. Fingal is torn because, if Barry elects to return to Ballbucklebo, he will have to let Jenny go, as there isn't enough business for three doctors. As he is a man who likes to fix things, he agonizes over what to do. There's an interesting twist to the end that solves everyone's problems. Also running through the modern side of the story is housekeeper "Kinky" Kincaid's romance with the local milkman. Their courtship was sweet and I loved following along. There's a great scene with Kinky confessing her worry over what would happen to the household if she marries and leaves the O'Reillys. I also loved her sweetheart's conversation with Fingal near the end of the book. I'm looking forward to getting my hands on the next four books and catching up. Some of them cover his time in the navy and I can't wait to read all about it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa of Hopewell

    I love this series (except for "An Irish Country Girl" which I thought was ridiculous), but it seemed to me that the author was "coasting" on this one. First the good: The story was as wonderful as Taylor's series always is. The characters are among my favorites. I honestly look forward to each new book in this series so much so that I hate to criticize, but I must. Now, The bad: Too much overly-stilted conversation drawn from newspapers of the day, old medical textbooks and the like. It is a ser I love this series (except for "An Irish Country Girl" which I thought was ridiculous), but it seemed to me that the author was "coasting" on this one. First the good: The story was as wonderful as Taylor's series always is. The characters are among my favorites. I honestly look forward to each new book in this series so much so that I hate to criticize, but I must. Now, The bad: Too much overly-stilted conversation drawn from newspapers of the day, old medical textbooks and the like. It is a series that does need medical explanations, but they got pretty long-winded in this one. When a character says something like "So, do you think England's King Edward will abdicate" and when a guy in a pub started pontificating in very newspaper-ish language about the Civil War in Spain, I groaned. It sometimes seemed as though he was stringing bits of story together with Wikipedia articles too. A lot of tourist guide stuff was wedged in, too, and there were blatant pandering to the Americans who likely buy most of these books such as phrases along the lines of this one, "a medical specialty known in American as Internal Medicine" that sort of thing. A small footnote explaining a term would have been much nicer than a long-winded reference book piece that nearly dis-rails the story. All of that said, I AM EAGERLY looking forward to the next installment. I listened to the audio and John Keating's performance was, as always, outstanding. He IS the voice of these characters to me as I have enjoyed most of this series on audio.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Having read all of Patrick's books and luckily having him as a delightful neighbour, I got a very early preview of it. I must say his books get better and better all the time. Besides letting us revel in the charm of the Ballybucklebo residents, Fingal O'Reilly's stories lead us to more and more facets of his life and broaden the horizons of his (and our) world. And just you wait for the next one!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I received this book as a winner of the First Reads Giveaway Program. I loved it! Having read the others, it was like coming home again and getting back in touch with familiar characters. It is comforting to know that this series has not ended - now I'll have to wait for the next book. Dr. Fingal O'Reilly and the others are as vivid in my mind as if I truly met them in real life. The book intertwined the past and present and Dr. Taylor even provided some interesting medical history as part of th I received this book as a winner of the First Reads Giveaway Program. I loved it! Having read the others, it was like coming home again and getting back in touch with familiar characters. It is comforting to know that this series has not ended - now I'll have to wait for the next book. Dr. Fingal O'Reilly and the others are as vivid in my mind as if I truly met them in real life. The book intertwined the past and present and Dr. Taylor even provided some interesting medical history as part of the plot. Thank you, Goodreads and Patrick Taylor for this book. It needs to be read, enjoyed, and celebrated, and shared with friends.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I recieved this book for free through the goodreads first reads program. I loved it! Fingal O'Reilly is such a lovable and relateable character. I was worried at first about the book jumping between past and present, but Taylor did an amazing job of seaming the two times together. A truly enjoyable read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michele Frazier

    These books are so interesting, they take you back to a time where modern medicine did not exist. Treatments were iffy and the world was on the edge of medical miracles.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tom Driver

    I've read all the Irish Country Doctor books through this latest offering and I've enjoyed each one. Taylor does a nice job bringing his characters to life and reading through book #8 is like catching up with old friends. I particularly enjoyed how Taylor used this book to give us additional back story on Fingal O'Reilly. It was interesting to follow Fingal through his first job as a GP in the rough part of Dublin. We also learned more about the early relationship between Fingal and Kitty. Throu I've read all the Irish Country Doctor books through this latest offering and I've enjoyed each one. Taylor does a nice job bringing his characters to life and reading through book #8 is like catching up with old friends. I particularly enjoyed how Taylor used this book to give us additional back story on Fingal O'Reilly. It was interesting to follow Fingal through his first job as a GP in the rough part of Dublin. We also learned more about the early relationship between Fingal and Kitty. Through the first seven books I always wondered why Fingal would let Kitty get away, and now we know. In addition to all the colorful characters that fill Taylor's stories I enjoy the medical history. Taylor does a great job using these stories to educate the reader on how many of the treatments we find common today actually came into practice. I always fascinated to learn how doctors practiced their craft before anti-biotics, for example. On top of that, Taylor enlightens us on many of the home-made remedies our grand parents and great-grand parents used on a regular basis. Looking forward to the next edition.

  9. 3 out of 5

    Diana

    This book is a great addition to a wonderful series, once I started it I couldn't put it down. These books are very entertaining, and I'm glad they were recommended to me. If you enjoy James Herriot or Richard Gordon these books are for you. Re-read 2018 This book alternates between the current timeline of the books of the mid-1960's, and the late 1930's when Dr. O'Reilly first becomes a practicing doctor. We're starting to get some of the original storylines wrapped up and new ones beginning. The This book is a great addition to a wonderful series, once I started it I couldn't put it down. These books are very entertaining, and I'm glad they were recommended to me. If you enjoy James Herriot or Richard Gordon these books are for you. Re-read 2018 This book alternates between the current timeline of the books of the mid-1960's, and the late 1930's when Dr. O'Reilly first becomes a practicing doctor. We're starting to get some of the original storylines wrapped up and new ones beginning. The most interesting storyline for me was the small look into how a female doctor was treated as a General Practitioner during the 60's, both the good and the bad.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    I adore the Irish Country Doctor books. The instant I open the cover, I'm transported to another place and time where I can spend time with some old friends. These books are absolutely delightful and this one is no exception. You know you're reading a good book when between the covers you can experience laughter and tears and the story touches your heart. I'm looking forward to my next visit to Ballybucklebo.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Connie

    I don't know how I discovered Patrick Taylor, but I'm glad I did. His books are fun, entertaining and the characters are wonderful. His stories are equal to me to those of Mauve Binchey, whom I absolutely love as well. I have all of Patrick Taylor's books. Love him.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Such fun, reading this book and learning how much the practice of medicine has changed with the added interest of the setting in Ireland. The characters are of continued interest.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    I came back to catch up on a favorite series, the Irish Country Doctor series by Patrick Taylor. Back to the Irish village of Ballybucklebo, Dr. Fingal O’Reilly, and all the colorful villagers that create unforgettable stories. Some are sad, some are happy, some are hilarious, but all are part of the fabric of Irish country life and the doctors that make compassion foremost in their lives. It’s been a few years since I finished #7 in the series. #8 “Fingal O’Reilly, Irish Doctor” came out but it I came back to catch up on a favorite series, the Irish Country Doctor series by Patrick Taylor. Back to the Irish village of Ballybucklebo, Dr. Fingal O’Reilly, and all the colorful villagers that create unforgettable stories. Some are sad, some are happy, some are hilarious, but all are part of the fabric of Irish country life and the doctors that make compassion foremost in their lives. It’s been a few years since I finished #7 in the series. #8 “Fingal O’Reilly, Irish Doctor” came out but it was in hardback and my collection are all paperbacks. (Gotta wait a year for that format; thus, I was behind.) I slid right back in to the village, all the characters familiar, and anxious to see what had changed. I thoroughly enjoyed my update with #8 and have #9 already started. It’s not necessary to rehash the story. Those of us who enjoyed the others should, of course, read them all. They are delightful! Fascinating to learn the evolution of medical innovations, treatments, and medicines came about. Very interesting! My only comment really won’t do any good at this point, but given that this one alternated with a thirty-year jump in time, I had to read several paragraphs of a new chapter to find out where my mind needed to focus: present time, or thirty years prior? It would have helped if either the year was stated on each chapter title, or even better Mr. Publisher – change the font slightly, or make the past italic. Too late. And nobody asked me! But I still love the series and love catching up!

  14. 3 out of 5

    Sharone Powell

    Navigating between Fingal's life as a newly married man at present to Fingal's work in the tenements of Dublin before the war. Fingal becomes attached to his patients and feels that being a GP is his life's calling. Of particular interest is him risking his career in order to save a poor boy's life by the use of a new kind of antibiotics. That was my favorite part. Other than that, nothing is much developed. I would have preferred a novel set completely in the past or the present and a story bet Navigating between Fingal's life as a newly married man at present to Fingal's work in the tenements of Dublin before the war. Fingal becomes attached to his patients and feels that being a GP is his life's calling. Of particular interest is him risking his career in order to save a poor boy's life by the use of a new kind of antibiotics. That was my favorite part. Other than that, nothing is much developed. I would have preferred a novel set completely in the past or the present and a story better fleshed out. Amongst the many, little stories: Kitty redecorates the doctor's office (oh, those roses on the wall!); Kitty as a young woman dating Fingal, but feeling second to his job; Counselor Bishop suffering a life-altering cardiac arrest; Barry Lafferty makes his decision about specializing vs. coming back to work with Fingal. Personally, I would have loved to have read more about Barry's experiences whilst specializing and more about what caused him to decide what he did. I feel as though the first books had revolved around him and Fingal, but later he becomes one of many characters, which is a shame. Also, the constant use of small, historical anecdotes really gets out of hand, in a sense that it really disrupts the flow of the stories.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cunning

    I think has been my favourite book of the series so far. There was so much heart in the story. To learn about the early days of 1930s medicine through O'Reilly's eyes all while getting a deeper insight to his family life and the twist and turns that he had Kitty O'Halloren had to take. I must tell you, knowing that the times of war are approaching and there is so much more to O'Reilly's past story makes me look forward to reading the next book. And with Kinky and Barry also returning while explo I think has been my favourite book of the series so far. There was so much heart in the story. To learn about the early days of 1930s medicine through O'Reilly's eyes all while getting a deeper insight to his family life and the twist and turns that he had Kitty O'Halloren had to take. I must tell you, knowing that the times of war are approaching and there is so much more to O'Reilly's past story makes me look forward to reading the next book. And with Kinky and Barry also returning while exploring different relationships, I look forward to reading more there too. I missed Barry in this book! Patrick Taylor has definitely made me love the characters of Ballybucklebo!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Storm

    I am 'reading' the book as an audiobook. I have been reading the series for years now and like other reviewers look forward to the characters. The explanations of the medical jargon seem to get longer. Though I work in the medical field and am very familiar with everything, i understand why for the non-medical reader, explanations are a must. But they turned very long. My main complaint with this book and the last as well, is the vocalization and socialization of the characters in the 1930s. It d I am 'reading' the book as an audiobook. I have been reading the series for years now and like other reviewers look forward to the characters. The explanations of the medical jargon seem to get longer. Though I work in the medical field and am very familiar with everything, i understand why for the non-medical reader, explanations are a must. But they turned very long. My main complaint with this book and the last as well, is the vocalization and socialization of the characters in the 1930s. It does not seem quite right. It appears to me that he used 1960s language, behavior and mentality and transposed them to the 1930s. It is just not quite right.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This book dragged on for me somewhat, going back and forth, confusingly at times between the past and present of Fingal O'Reilly's life. Patrick Taylor's writing is consistent, his stories feel authentic and are certainly entertaining. I persevered with this book as I needed to know why Kitty broke up with him. I found the chapters about his experimentation with the early version of sulfonamides very interesting. I think if I hadn't just read several others in the series, I would have enjoyed th This book dragged on for me somewhat, going back and forth, confusingly at times between the past and present of Fingal O'Reilly's life. Patrick Taylor's writing is consistent, his stories feel authentic and are certainly entertaining. I persevered with this book as I needed to know why Kitty broke up with him. I found the chapters about his experimentation with the early version of sulfonamides very interesting. I think if I hadn't just read several others in the series, I would have enjoyed the book more. I was just needing a change.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Toni Laliberte

    This book was a departure from the other books in that it jumped back and forth from the 1930's, when Dr. O'Reilly first became a doctor and was working in Dublin and the 1960's, in Ballybucklebo. I really enjoyed learning about where he first worked as a doctor, in the Tenements. He really cared about all his patients, just like he still does. He's a remarkable character. Patrick Taylor is a phenomenal author. He explains all the medical jargon in a way that doesn't confuse me or lose me. I'm r This book was a departure from the other books in that it jumped back and forth from the 1930's, when Dr. O'Reilly first became a doctor and was working in Dublin and the 1960's, in Ballybucklebo. I really enjoyed learning about where he first worked as a doctor, in the Tenements. He really cared about all his patients, just like he still does. He's a remarkable character. Patrick Taylor is a phenomenal author. He explains all the medical jargon in a way that doesn't confuse me or lose me. I'm really enjoying this series! On to book nine.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I enjoy the series of books - and this is the 4th one I read - but I have to say I got very bored with this one and just wanted it to end. I feel the writer tried to fill pages and so many of the pages felt like a basic history book on medical practices. While I enjoyed the stories of the characters when the book turned to being real specific, descriptive of some medical finding or procedure I found my mind wandering. The narrator was, as always, very good. I will take a break from the series for a I enjoy the series of books - and this is the 4th one I read - but I have to say I got very bored with this one and just wanted it to end. I feel the writer tried to fill pages and so many of the pages felt like a basic history book on medical practices. While I enjoyed the stories of the characters when the book turned to being real specific, descriptive of some medical finding or procedure I found my mind wandering. The narrator was, as always, very good. I will take a break from the series for a while now.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Annemarie Pedersen

    I'm on a bit of an Irish country doctor marathon right now but really enjoyed this one and how it switched back and fort between the young doctor O'Reilly in the 30's and the goings on in Ballybucklebo in the 60's. A lot of great examples of how much medicine had changed in those years and how both eras were on the cusp of major change. Very enjoyable and as always, lovely to visit this characters again.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    I definitely want to read this whole series! Patrick Taylor has created a wonderful, compassionate character in Fingal O'Reilly and all who come into his life. It's funny, sad, witty, and everything that's wonderful and Irish. Taylor has also included a glossary of sayings and vocabulary that greatly helped me understand ; not that it was hard to read. This is a pleasure! Give this series a try!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patrice Fischer

    I would give this book (1 of several in a series) a 4.5. I'm sure this author isn't for everyone. However, at bedtime it's nice to read a novel that is not too taxing on either intellect or emotions. Plus, I learn quite a few things about Ireland/medical practice/life in the 1960's each time. All in all, a satisfying read.

  23. 3 out of 5

    Diane Adams

    I am gradually working my way through this series. It was very interesting to go back and forth in the story between Fingal’s early practice and the time current to most of the series. I enjoyed learning more about his early relationship with Kitty and events and people who shaped his career as a doctor. Afraid to leave spoilers, so I’ll just say I can’t wait to read the next installment!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    When I read these books I feel like I'm coming home. Such vivid,warm characters and environments I never tire of a visit to Ballybucklebo! If you enjoy the Irish Country Doctor series don't miss this one!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    The story alternates between Dr. Fingal O'Reilly's current medical practice in the Irish village of Ballybucklebo, and his early days as a new graduate in Dublin. The narrator, John Keating, brings the story to life with has wonderful assortment of Irish voices.

  26. 3 out of 5

    Tom Garland

    Lite reading but well written about an Irish Doctor. I generally don't like characters who are too perfect or too evil. We are all a little of both. Fingal is a little too perfect which makes him less real.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adrianne Adelle

    Awesome, very well written novel. Didn't realize it was a series haha but it was an awesome read picking it up at book 10. Loved the character development and the real to life medical references throughout. Cant wait to read more in the series. :)

  28. 3 out of 5

    Martha

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ahh Fingal you old goat. You could charm anyone with your ways.

  29. 3 out of 5

    Beverly

    Learned a lot about the development of medicine in the 20th century. Love all the characters, Kinky's recipes and the glossary of Irish terms. Great stuff.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Linda Shaughnessy

    I really enjoy these Patrick Taylor books. They transport one to Ireland. The dialogue, the dialects, the vocabulary (glossary in the back), and lots of information and history. Fun!

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