Hot Best Seller

The Wily O'Reilly: Irish Country Stories PDF, ePub eBook

The Wily O'Reilly: Irish Country Stories

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: The Wily O'Reilly: Irish Country Stories .pdf

The pdf file download will begin after you complete the registration. Downloader's Terms of Service | DMCA

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


The Wily O'Reilly: Irish Country Stories Long before Dr. Fingal Flahertie O’Reilly made most readers’ acquaintance in Patrick Taylor’s bestselling novel An Irish Country Doctor, he appeared in a series of humorous columns originally published in Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour. These warm and wryly amusing vignettes provide an early glimpse at the redoubtable Dr. O’Reilly as he tends to the colourful and Long before Dr. Fingal Flahertie O’Reilly made most readers’ acquaintance in Patrick Taylor’s bestselling novel An Irish Country Doctor, he appeared in a series of humorous columns originally published in Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour. These warm and wryly amusing vignettes provide an early glimpse at the redoubtable Dr. O’Reilly as he tends to the colourful and eccentric residents of Ballybucklebo, a cozy Ulster village nestled in the bygone years of the early sixties. Those seminal columns have been collected in The Wily O’Reilly: Irish Country Stories. In this convenient volume, Patrick Taylor’s legions of devoted fans can savor the enchanting origins of the Irish Country series . . . and newcomers to Ballybucklebo can meet O’Reilly for the very first time. An ex-Navy boxing champion, classical scholar, crypto-philanthropist, widower, and hard-working general practitioner, Fingal Flahertie O’Reilly is crafty and cantankerous in these charming slices of rural Irish life. Whether he’s educating a naive man of the cloth in the facts of life, dealing with chronic hypochondriacs and malingerers, clashing with pigheaded colleagues, or raising a pint in the neighborhood pub, the wily O’Reilly knows a doctor’s work is never done, even if some of his “cures” can’t be found in any medical text!

30 review for The Wily O'Reilly: Irish Country Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jina Howell-Forbes

    Up until now I have loved every book in the Irish Country Doctor Series. This latest entry however, was a disappointment. The book is a series of short vignettes about the characters that appear in the rest of the books. These are re-prints of stories that were published in medical monthly publications before the first of the novels were published. The problem with this book is that at least half the stories were repeated at least in part in the regular books. I knew the endings before they occu Up until now I have loved every book in the Irish Country Doctor Series. This latest entry however, was a disappointment. The book is a series of short vignettes about the characters that appear in the rest of the books. These are re-prints of stories that were published in medical monthly publications before the first of the novels were published. The problem with this book is that at least half the stories were repeated at least in part in the regular books. I knew the endings before they occurred. The other problem with this book is that the characters are much less developed then they became in book form. O'Reilly is portrayed as a hot tempered braggart. His assistant acts like a stupid gutless wimp. Mrs. Kincaid is hardly there. Worst of all, Donnal Donnelly is portrayed as slow-witted buffoon rather than as the sly and clever cheat, who was basically a good man underneath. Even O'Reilly's dog is shown as a disobedient clown. I look forward to the next book where the characters are growing and changing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    There are vingettes throughout the series of books and numerous short stories that occurred throughout and they combined them into this book. I have read all the books, and all these stories are familiar to those who have read them. I love Taylor's series about Dr. Fingal Flaherty O'Reilly and the world he inhabits. I've likened the series to a human/Irish version of the All Things Great and Small books (featuring animals/English). This book, however, was a collection of magazine columns that th There are vingettes throughout the series of books and numerous short stories that occurred throughout and they combined them into this book. I have read all the books, and all these stories are familiar to those who have read them. I love Taylor's series about Dr. Fingal Flaherty O'Reilly and the world he inhabits. I've likened the series to a human/Irish version of the All Things Great and Small books (featuring animals/English). This book, however, was a collection of magazine columns that the author wrote before he began writing the O'Reilly novels in earnest. At the time the author was very free w/the most extravagant analogies -- those got old really quickly when reading the columns back to back. I would advise skipping this book in the series -- but the rest of the books are simply wonderful!

  3. 3 out of 5

    Diana

    This book has all the short stories that started the Irish Country series, with Dr. Fingal O'Reilly. You'll recognize many of the stories in this anthology, though some were new to me. These were published in many journals by the author, and instead of the character Barry Lafferty, he inserted himself as the doctors assistant. This book wasn't my favorite in the series, due to the fact that there were a lot of repeats, though if I hadn't been binging the series prior to this book, it may not hav This book has all the short stories that started the Irish Country series, with Dr. Fingal O'Reilly. You'll recognize many of the stories in this anthology, though some were new to me. These were published in many journals by the author, and instead of the character Barry Lafferty, he inserted himself as the doctors assistant. This book wasn't my favorite in the series, due to the fact that there were a lot of repeats, though if I hadn't been binging the series prior to this book, it may not have been so repetitive. If you're a fan of the series, I suggest reading the book at least once as a part of the series.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Sarah

    I give myself a pat on the back for actually finishing this book, but it was a hard slog! I have truly loved all the Irish Country series, but not this one. "The Wily O'Reilly", a collection of columns previously published in "Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour", was put together and (re)published in 2014; perhaps I would have liked it better if I'd read it before the other O'Reilly novels? They weren't even short stories, in the true sense, just modified extracts of the other books (or, to I give myself a pat on the back for actually finishing this book, but it was a hard slog! I have truly loved all the Irish Country series, but not this one. "The Wily O'Reilly", a collection of columns previously published in "Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour", was put together and (re)published in 2014; perhaps I would have liked it better if I'd read it before the other O'Reilly novels? They weren't even short stories, in the true sense, just modified extracts of the other books (or, to be exact, original ideas later used in the series of novels) plus a few extra anecdotes, all served with an annoyingly pedantic sauce. Patrick Taylor tries much too hard to be funny and it just doesn't work. There should be a warning label on this book: "Don't read this if you've liked the other novels in the series!" Disappointing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This is a collection of columns written by Patrick Taylor about Doctor Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly for Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour before Taylor began his series of novels about the wonderful characters of Ballybucklebo, Northern Ireland. It is a delightful read, and should whet the appetite of the reader to read more about the Doctor.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I love the Irish Country series and have been reading the books since their beginning in 2007. I have lost count of the number of times I have laughed until I've cried. It was intriguing to read at the beginning of this book of how the novels came to be. Each chapter is about three or four pages long and is made up of one of Dr. Taylor's columns from the Canadian medical magazine Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour. They are chronological, and it is easy to see the development of the author' I love the Irish Country series and have been reading the books since their beginning in 2007. I have lost count of the number of times I have laughed until I've cried. It was intriguing to read at the beginning of this book of how the novels came to be. Each chapter is about three or four pages long and is made up of one of Dr. Taylor's columns from the Canadian medical magazine Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour. They are chronological, and it is easy to see the development of the author's writing style. In these stories, Dr. O'Reilly's assistant is the author himself, rather than the Dr. Laverty we come to know in the series. Each one shows Dr. O'Reilly in his role as doctor, mentor, friend, and occasionally the hand of justice. In some stories, there are the seeds that come into full flower in the novels, where the situations and characters are further developed. Some of the characters have undergone significant changes between the columns and the books, most notably (in my opinion) Donal Donnelly. In the columns, he is rather simple and not overly bright, while in the novels he has a unique cleverness that gets him into and out of all kinds of trouble. I thoroughly enjoyed the early looks at Bertie Bishop, Kinky the housekeeper, and other residents of Ballbucklebo. The heart of the small village is the same, from columns to novels. This Dr. O'Reilly is a bit more rough around the edges, but the essence of him is the same. I loved seeing his ease and kindness with the children, even those that tried his patience, such as his nephew, Willy. I laughed out loud at the two little ones who came to him for pre-marital counseling, and again at Willy's portrayal of the innkeeper during the Christmas play. The wily Dr. O'Reilly had many opportunities to demonstrate to young Dr. Taylor that not all cures came out of a bottle. Some of the best stories came from just knowing your patient and understanding where they were coming from. I especially loved his encounters with Miss Maggie MacCorkle and how he never made her feel foolish. He also did not suffer fools gladly, and there were several occasions where he found interesting ways to deliver rough justice to those who offended him. There were several stories that would have been right at home in James Herriot's All Creatures books. There were a couple of amusing stories involving pigs, the doctor's least favorite animal. My favorites were those involving his cat, Lady Macbeth, and his black lab, Arthur Guinness. The best were the two stories where first, Dr. O'Reilly decided that taking Lady Macbeth out on his boat was an excellent idea. It did not end well, for either the boat or the doctor. The subsequent trip, with Arthur, was equally hilarious. The book finished with a short story "Home is the Sailor" about O'Reilly's return to Ballbucklebo after being away at war for six years. It is the beginning of his career as village's doctor, full of his fears about whether he can make a go of it. The maturing of the author's characterizations is clear, and I loved O'Reilly's encounters with his early patients.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Wood

    The book is actually a collection of newspaper columns about an old fashioned Irish doctor from the perspective of the young doctor who assisted in his practice. Written by an Irish expat now living in Canada, I surmise that the inspiration for these tales is provided by the author's own experiences. Doctor O'Reilly is an unconventional, opinionated, hard drinking character whose antics keep the reader entertained and smiling. Using occasional restatements of familiar phrases and alliterative ru The book is actually a collection of newspaper columns about an old fashioned Irish doctor from the perspective of the young doctor who assisted in his practice. Written by an Irish expat now living in Canada, I surmise that the inspiration for these tales is provided by the author's own experiences. Doctor O'Reilly is an unconventional, opinionated, hard drinking character whose antics keep the reader entertained and smiling. Using occasional restatements of familiar phrases and alliterative runs the author brings the wily O'Reilly to life. Although there is occasional Irish slang and dialect it works well and doesn't interfere with the flow of the narrative. Meeting O'Reilly has put a smile on my face and a bit of joy in my heart.

  8. 3 out of 5

    Sheillagh

    Wonderful book by Patrick Taylor. He writes about Dr. Fingal O'Reilly from the time he takes over the practice of a retired doctor, after returning from serving in WWII in the British Navy on the Warsprite. Each chapter is a vignette of a day in the life of this Irish country doctor in the town of Ballybucklebo, County Down, Northern Ireland. As you read each chapter, you are introduced to the people of this little town, and how they related to Dr. O'Reilly. By the time you finish this book, you Wonderful book by Patrick Taylor. He writes about Dr. Fingal O'Reilly from the time he takes over the practice of a retired doctor, after returning from serving in WWII in the British Navy on the Warsprite. Each chapter is a vignette of a day in the life of this Irish country doctor in the town of Ballybucklebo, County Down, Northern Ireland. As you read each chapter, you are introduced to the people of this little town, and how they related to Dr. O'Reilly. By the time you finish this book, you will feel like you know all the characters and want to go visit this place! Found myself laughing right out loud at times!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Almira

    Patrick Taylor had written a series of articles for Stitches: The Journal of Medical Humour. This collection of stories brings all of these articles to reveal the evolution of Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly of Ballybucklebo. They are about 3-4 pages in length full of humour. At the very end Patrick introduces us to exactly how Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly and Kinky become a "team". I enjoyed this very much, and if you are a fan of the Irish Country series give this one a try

  10. 3 out of 5

    Connie

    I love Patrick Taylot and his Irish Country Doctor series. What I didn't realize until I read this book of short stories is that Dr. Fingal O'Reilly was actually the mentor and trainer for Dr. Patrick Taylor. That fact makes it all that much more fun.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Joyce

    This book is a collection of newspaper columns written about Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly as told by his new assistant, Dr. Patrick Taylor. These columns later turned into the Irish Country Doctor series, much beloved my many readers, including myself. These stories depict Dr. O'Reilly in a very rough form compared to the character we love in the later books. Many of the stories in the books grew out of these columns, as well. I'm very glad Taylor the author continued to mold and refine the cha This book is a collection of newspaper columns written about Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly as told by his new assistant, Dr. Patrick Taylor. These columns later turned into the Irish Country Doctor series, much beloved my many readers, including myself. These stories depict Dr. O'Reilly in a very rough form compared to the character we love in the later books. Many of the stories in the books grew out of these columns, as well. I'm very glad Taylor the author continued to mold and refine the characters he originally created for the newspaper. His later creations that we meet his his books are much more finely honed, and frankly, more likable. While it was interesting to see where and how the series started, I am glad to be well-acquainted with its final evolution. Note: This book also includes the very enjoyable short story, "Home is the Sailor," which outlines O'Reilly's beginning as the new doctor in Ballybucklebo.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    So the issue with a compilation of short stories is that characters have to be introduced each time. When your title character has like, three main attributes, all of which always come into play for each plot, you’re hearing about the telltale sign of O’Riley’s temper literally every four minutes sometimes. An interesting facet, though, was that only in this medium does it become clear how much Patrick Taylor in his main series was repressing his own personality/sense of who he is as a character So the issue with a compilation of short stories is that characters have to be introduced each time. When your title character has like, three main attributes, all of which always come into play for each plot, you’re hearing about the telltale sign of O’Riley’s temper literally every four minutes sometimes. An interesting facet, though, was that only in this medium does it become clear how much Patrick Taylor in his main series was repressing his own personality/sense of who he is as a character. That comes through in these more memoir-like anecdotes— sometimes in amusing moments where someone addresses him as Pat and the reader startles to remember he has a name besides “the young doctor”. Other times it came through in the repetition of a bit where Pat comically misunderstands O’Riley and prolongs The Who’s on First style gag by asking repetitious questions. Some of the jokes were quite good, but this was a by no means necessary diversion from the main series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fredell Boston

    A fun read! Lots of insight into the rural practice of medicine in Northern Ireland. Remembrances and anecdotes about Doctor Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly, the alter ego of the 'real' Dr. Reilly, by his protege, Dr. Patrick Taylor. O'Reilly is lovingly described as irascible,blasphemous, hard-drinking, mischievous, poacher, sailor, AND many other things--depending on who you talked to. He was dedicated to his patients, even if he found them somewhat tedious and hypochondriacal, and they loved him in A fun read! Lots of insight into the rural practice of medicine in Northern Ireland. Remembrances and anecdotes about Doctor Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly, the alter ego of the 'real' Dr. Reilly, by his protege, Dr. Patrick Taylor. O'Reilly is lovingly described as irascible,blasphemous, hard-drinking, mischievous, poacher, sailor, AND many other things--depending on who you talked to. He was dedicated to his patients, even if he found them somewhat tedious and hypochondriacal, and they loved him in turn. The stories began as part of a monthly, then weekly, column written by Dr. Taylor after he moved to Canada to practice medicine there. His readers and publisher begged him to compile a volume of these stories once his column came to and end. I'm glad he did, these short tales were poignant and funny. I enjoyed every minute of reading them.

  14. 3 out of 5

    Nila Novotny

    This book is listed as #9.5 on the series by Patrick Taylor. I've read all the books up to and including this one and am planning to read additional books. I have to admit this is the weakest of the series because much of it is repetitive with anecdotes found in the previous books so I skipped some parts as I listened to the audiobook. It clarified a few things from fiction to fact (I think) so that was enlightening. I primarily like the medical stories that Taylor writes about so when it's more This book is listed as #9.5 on the series by Patrick Taylor. I've read all the books up to and including this one and am planning to read additional books. I have to admit this is the weakest of the series because much of it is repetitive with anecdotes found in the previous books so I skipped some parts as I listened to the audiobook. It clarified a few things from fiction to fact (I think) so that was enlightening. I primarily like the medical stories that Taylor writes about so when it's more human interest and community stories I lose my interest a little bit. Overall it was worth the time spent to read it.

  15. 3 out of 5

    Toni Laliberte

    Finished with the whole series! This book is filled with short stories, and tells how Patrick Taylor started writing about Dr. O'Reilly and the residents of Ballybucklebo. It was hard to get through because some of the characters had changed or there were new characters, plus the storytelling was different. Definitely not my favorite. Still has charm and wit, though. The last story is actually longer and is called, The Heart is a Sailor, which was an ebook first. That was really good and gets 4 Finished with the whole series! This book is filled with short stories, and tells how Patrick Taylor started writing about Dr. O'Reilly and the residents of Ballybucklebo. It was hard to get through because some of the characters had changed or there were new characters, plus the storytelling was different. Definitely not my favorite. Still has charm and wit, though. The last story is actually longer and is called, The Heart is a Sailor, which was an ebook first. That was really good and gets 4 stars.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I love Taylor's series about Dr. Fingal Flaherty O'Reilly and the world he inhabits. I've likened the series to a human/Irish version of the All Things Great and Small books (featuring animals/English). This book, however, was a collection of magazine columns that the author wrote before he began writing the O'Reilly novels in earnest. At the time the author was very free w/the most extravagant analogies -- those got old really quickly when reading the columns back to back. I would advise skippi I love Taylor's series about Dr. Fingal Flaherty O'Reilly and the world he inhabits. I've likened the series to a human/Irish version of the All Things Great and Small books (featuring animals/English). This book, however, was a collection of magazine columns that the author wrote before he began writing the O'Reilly novels in earnest. At the time the author was very free w/the most extravagant analogies -- those got old really quickly when reading the columns back to back. I would advise skipping this book in the series -- but the rest of the books are simply wonderful!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cathymw

    [Actual rating 2.5] This book is a collection of short stories that served as the inspiration for the book series. I much prefer the books since the characters are more fully developed and the characters are presented in a less disagreeable manner.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mikki Fisher

    Fun, light reading for bedtime or restful downtime - when other, more action-packed novels simply will not do! I found myself laughing out loud - nay, guffawing - in many places. Brings back the feeling of a bygone, simpler time in history.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Donna

    I have enjoyed the other Patrick Taylor books. This one is a collection of short tales about his mentor Dr. O'Reilly. Initially, I enjoyed them, but after a bit got a little repetitive. Maybe should have shortened it a little.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laurence M.

    Repetitive Most of the stories are repeats from the books and are neither as well written nor as interesting. Don't recommend is you've read the series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Seth Nelson

    Just shy of being good.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Mcalister

    Short stories or articles rather than a novel. Ok read, and some funny parts, but I like the novels better

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Love the humour and warmth of these stories.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Interesting very short storied on how Dr. O'Reilly became the much loved doctor in the series.

  25. 3 out of 5

    Rose Ann

    Meh.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    A collection of short stories that first appeared in a Medical Journal. I'm not a fan of short stories and, because of how they were published, they retread introductions a lot. There were cute stories, but the overall read wasn't all that satisfying.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This was a delightful collection of tales, and just the thing to snap me out of a winter funk.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paula Dembeck

    Many readers have wondered where the idea for the fictional and whimsical village of Ballybucklebo and the characters that live in the Irish Country Doctor Series originated. This volume provides an answer to that question. As Patrick Taylor explains, he began writing a monthly column for a medical journal in which he made tongue in cheek observations about the medical world. This led him to create the fictional character of Ulster GP Dr. Fingal O’Reilly and Dr. Barry Laverty, the newly qualifie Many readers have wondered where the idea for the fictional and whimsical village of Ballybucklebo and the characters that live in the Irish Country Doctor Series originated. This volume provides an answer to that question. As Patrick Taylor explains, he began writing a monthly column for a medical journal in which he made tongue in cheek observations about the medical world. This led him to create the fictional character of Ulster GP Dr. Fingal O’Reilly and Dr. Barry Laverty, the newly qualified and innocent medical graduate who accepts a position in O’Reilly’s practice. Some ideas for the column he wrote for the medical journal came from Taylor’s own experience, some from the experience of his friends and some from stories he heard in pubs. The Irish Country Doctor Series began publishing in 2007 and it was in this series that Taylor fleshed out the personality of the cantankerous, hard drinking irascible Fingal O’Reilly and some of the quirky village characters that are his patients. The collection is made up of seven separate volumes, interrupted by this addition which is not a part of the ongoing series. The story teller in each of the tales is the young Dr. Barry Laverty who is in the process of being initiated into Fingal’s rather unorthodox practice. O’Reilly in his own unassuming way, tries to provide resolution to physical problems as well as village issues, whether it is taming the village bully Bertie Bishop, dealing with malingerers, or advising a cleric on fertility issues. These are very short chapters, anywhere from three to five pages long with only the final entry, recently released as an ebook, being longer. I am a fan of the series and have read all the books in the order they were published. They are easy entertaining reads. But like others who have read the series, I found this book a disappointment. At least half of these stories have been elaborated on and fill the books I have already read, so each time I started a chapter I already knew how the story would end. And of course the characters are just sketched and not fully developed as they are in the series. Some are even quite different, such as Mrs. Kincaid, an important figure in the books who is barely mentioned and Donal Donnelly who is portrayed as a slow witted buffoon rather than the sly and crafty entrepreneur he is in the series. It is interesting to note how Taylor has developed his skill as a writer. At times the humor in these short chapters seems forced and over the top, whereas in the series, Taylor has perfected the process of injecting comedy in his narrative using a much easier and more comfortable style. If you have not read the series this may be a good starting point, but I think if you have read or are reading the book series, you will find this read a disappointment.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alaine

    I absolutely LOVE The "Irish Country" stories. I was anxious to hear the continuing adventures of Doctors O'Reilly and Laverty and the denizens of Ballybucklebo. I was slightly disappointed to find this was a collection of columns published in a medical journal which the later "Irish Country" Stories were based. It also includes a written version of "Home Is The Sailor" an e-book about Dr Fingal O'Reilly's life after serving on the HMS Warsprite. I have found all of Dr. Patrick Taylor's writings I absolutely LOVE The "Irish Country" stories. I was anxious to hear the continuing adventures of Doctors O'Reilly and Laverty and the denizens of Ballybucklebo. I was slightly disappointed to find this was a collection of columns published in a medical journal which the later "Irish Country" Stories were based. It also includes a written version of "Home Is The Sailor" an e-book about Dr Fingal O'Reilly's life after serving on the HMS Warsprite. I have found all of Dr. Patrick Taylor's writings about Ballybucklebo and it's surroundings completely enchanting. But I discovered, quite quickly that all the chapters in this novel were familiar to me with some small alterations and name changes. I got a little confused when Dr. O'Reilly said "Pat" instead of "Barry" or when her referred to Lars O'Reilly's children! Overall this book was a fun, worthy read. I just highly anticipate the next installment "The Irish Country Doctor." I will wait, impatiently for Dr. Patrick Taylor's next work, more power to your wheel, Sir!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I love these Irish country doctor books. This one had a lot of annoying forced alliterative constructions, though you had to admire the author's grasp of vocabulary. It starts with the young Doctor Taylor coming home from the war to resume his position with Doctor Fungal O'Reilly in the Ulster town of Ballybucklebo. The book is a collection of humorous columns originally published in The Journal of Medical Humour. I'd be reading along and all of a sudden I would be laughing so hard that tears we I love these Irish country doctor books. This one had a lot of annoying forced alliterative constructions, though you had to admire the author's grasp of vocabulary. It starts with the young Doctor Taylor coming home from the war to resume his position with Doctor Fungal O'Reilly in the Ulster town of Ballybucklebo. The book is a collection of humorous columns originally published in The Journal of Medical Humour. I'd be reading along and all of a sudden I would be laughing so hard that tears were coming to my eyes. Unfortunately, these are not one-liners that can be read out of context to someone else to have the same effect. The doctors' patients are simple gullible peasants with many quirks and eccentricities that contrast sharply with today's patients who consult the internet and diagnose themselves before seeing their doctors. Today's doctors may wish their patients were more like them. The comparison of Patrick Taylor to James Herriot I think is very apt. I recommend this book for summer reading or as an antidote to the blues.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.