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An Irish Doctor in Love and at Sea Long before Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly came to the colourful Irish village of Ballybucklebo, young Surgeon-lieutenant O'Reilly answered the call of duty to serve in World War II. Fingal just wants to marry his beloved Deirdre and live happily ever after. First he must hone his skills at a British naval hospital before reporting back to the HMS 'Warspite,' where, as a sh Long before Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly came to the colourful Irish village of Ballybucklebo, young Surgeon-lieutenant O'Reilly answered the call of duty to serve in World War II. Fingal just wants to marry his beloved Deirdre and live happily ever after. First he must hone his skills at a British naval hospital before reporting back to the HMS 'Warspite,' where, as a ship's doctor, he faces danger upon the high seas. With German bombers a constant threat, the future has never been more uncertain, but Fingal and Deirdre are determined to make a life together . . . no matter what may lie ahead. Decades later, the war is long over, and O'Reilly is content to mend the bodies and souls of his patients in Ballybucklebo, but there are still changes and challenges aplenty. A difficult pregnancy, as well as an old colleague badly in denial concerning his own serious medical condition, tests O'Reilly and his young partner, Barry Laverty. But even with all that occupies him in the present, can O'Reilly ever truly let go of the ghosts from his past? Shifting effortlessly between two singular eras, bestselling author Patrick Taylor continues the story of O'Reilly's wartime experiences, while vividly bringing the daily joys and struggles of Ballybucklebo to life once more. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

30 review for An Irish Doctor in Love and at Sea

  1. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Well I think this series is going to continue on for some time. I am no longer going to follow it where it goes. Patrick Taylor joins a list of authors that I have read and initially loved, who I decided that time is short, and I refuse to read anymore books by this author anymore when there are better books to spend my time with. Please note that if you have not read the series til now, there will be spoilers included from the previous books. I was initially crazy about this series. The first bo Well I think this series is going to continue on for some time. I am no longer going to follow it where it goes. Patrick Taylor joins a list of authors that I have read and initially loved, who I decided that time is short, and I refuse to read anymore books by this author anymore when there are better books to spend my time with. Please note that if you have not read the series til now, there will be spoilers included from the previous books. I was initially crazy about this series. The first book in the series, An Irish Country Doctor (Irish Country #1) was a bit long and had a lot of medical information that I didn't think was that necessary, but all in all I was pretty happy to read about the characters of Doctor Fingal O'Reilly and Doctor Barry Laverty. Reading about the mythical village of Ballybucklebo and all of it's citizens was a fun way to pass the time. Up until An Irish Country Courtship (Irish Country #5) I was pretty happy with the series. Mr. Taylor took pains to include both Fingal and Barry's points of view so it didn't feel too bogged down with just one character. However, that all seemed to stop when we started to focus solely on the character of Fingal in the series, starting with A Dublin Student Doctor (Irish Country #6). Though we seemed to return to form with An Irish Country Wedding (Irish Country #7) and I hoped that the standalone novel that we got focusing on O'Reilly was just a one-off. Especially because I didn't love it the same way that I loved An Irish Country Girl (Irish Country #4) that focused on the character of Mrs. Kinky Kincaid who was the housekeeper to both Doctors. However, Mr. Taylor proceeded to write whole novels with O'Reilly with the reader following his student days in Dublin, his initial romance with his now wife, Kitty, and we would hear rumblings about how he met and lost his first wife which were Fingal O'Reilly, Irish Doctor (Irish Country #8), An Irish Doctor in Peace and at War (Irish Country #9) and The Wily O'Reilly: Irish Country Stories (Irish Country #10). In the latter books we lost the important POV of Barry which I thought kept the books more realistic. Reading about O'Reilly at a younger age became increasingly boring to me as a reader. And that's because we already knew his story in the first book. A widower who lost his wife during World War II. Why in the world this is constantly harped on through what is it now, 9 books if you take away the one focusing on Mrs. Kincaid, was a bit much. And I think that's the problem. Reading about O'Reilly's past through several books was not that interesting. He served on a warship, he got married, he lost his wife, I don't think readers needed to be taken down every nook and cranny in the character's life. We pretty much lost any other characters being discussed in depth in these books now. Mrs. Kincaid (now remarried) was barely in this book), Barry, Jenny, heck even most of the villagers are now tertiary characters in the saga of O'Reilly's life. And since we didn't really get a chance to know the character of Deirdre in the last book, we focus on her a lot in this book, and wow, this character read like a cardboard cutout of a perfect woman. Unlike with the character of Kitty, Deirdre never felt real to me in the last book or this one. And the plot line which was thin at best, is pretty much the same as it is through the last several books. We always have a mysterious ailment that the Doctors try to figure out, usually it is an ailment attached to a character that the Doctors do not get along with. The character of Donal who always has a scheme that O'Reilly feels obliged to help out in, Barry going through issues in his relationships, O'Reilly trying to stick his nose in something and fix it, etc. These are all things that we have read before. There is nothing new here in the series, or nothing new that is going to keep me coming back for me. The writing was clunky throughout the book. I think that was because we had Taylor throwing in references to O'Reilly reading about nuclear testing going on in Nevada, the Beatles, etc. The medical discussion about the rhesus monkey blood type put me to sleep, several times. I always thought the book had way too much in depth medical discussion back and forth between characters that dragged, but this one took the cake. And once again the flow was horrible from beginning to end in this book from the flashbacks to O'Reilly's past and the present. We have O'Reilly and Kitty making that trip to Spain and it literally only took maybe 6 or 7 pages. I cannot believe this was a whole plotline in the last book for it to be dealt with this quickly in this book and for it to not even really matter at all. The setting of Ballybucklebo never comes fully alive in this book. Probably because we were often in other places in O'Reilly's past in this book, and we would only have brief conversations with characters in the present. The ending didn't have the same ring to it as previous books. I swear it felt like a mishmash of the previous books with a celebration always happening at the Doctors home with somehow the entire village able to be in their upstairs parlor. It's not very believable and I just sighed my way through it. I just plan on re-reading the books from the series that I liked, and pretty much ignoring all new offerings.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    This book like the prior one in the series “An Irish Doctor in Peace and War” is full of flashback memories of World War II. In the prior book O’Reilly was entering anesthesiology training at the Royal Naval Hospital Hasler in Portsmouth. Deirdre meets O’Reilly in Portsmouth to get married. This book picks up as O’Reilly enters training. In the current time, 1964, O’Reilly attends a medical school reunion and a former classmate is ill. Back in Ballybucklebo Barry is depressed because his fiancée, This book like the prior one in the series “An Irish Doctor in Peace and War” is full of flashback memories of World War II. In the prior book O’Reilly was entering anesthesiology training at the Royal Naval Hospital Hasler in Portsmouth. Deirdre meets O’Reilly in Portsmouth to get married. This book picks up as O’Reilly enters training. In the current time, 1964, O’Reilly attends a medical school reunion and a former classmate is ill. Back in Ballybucklebo Barry is depressed because his fiancée, Sue, has bet a charming Frenchman while on teaching exchange. The book is well written and is a “feel good” book. The story tells about life in a rural Northern Ireland village in the 1960s. The book is full of gentle humor and emotional stories taking place in the beautiful rural village. In the flashbacks Taylor tells of what life was like during World War II. I still enjoy the housekeeper/cook Kinky and her delightful cork accent and humor. I have read the majority of books in this series as audiobooks. With all the various accents and Irish words, it is great to have a fantastic narrator, John Keating, able to performs them perfectly. Keating is an Irish actor and audiobook narrator. The book is just over eighteen and a half hours long.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    This is a flashback novel in the series. It gives you more background into Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reily and his life before he came to Ballybucklebo. I absolutely love this series and will be sad to see it eventually end. I have a wonderful time escaping to this small fictional town in Northern Ireland and spending time with the unique people who live there. I picked up the first one on a whim after seeing it in my local library and I have been hooked ever since. It reminds me a bit of the old " This is a flashback novel in the series. It gives you more background into Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reily and his life before he came to Ballybucklebo. I absolutely love this series and will be sad to see it eventually end. I have a wonderful time escaping to this small fictional town in Northern Ireland and spending time with the unique people who live there. I picked up the first one on a whim after seeing it in my local library and I have been hooked ever since. It reminds me a bit of the old "Doctor in the House books by Richard Gordon, though in set in a newer era.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    This book gives you more of the backstory for Dr. Fingal O'Reilly of Ballybucklebo, Ireland. This book switches between the present day and O'Reilly's time serving in the Royal Navy during World War II. The book is very sad at times when focusing on the war. I'm still really enjoying this series, and am not looking forward to when I catch up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Second Read: I've enjoyed this read a lot more than I did the first time. The Story is still very long, but it was a lot more enjoyable. I'm a big Patrick Taylor Fan. He is a delightful writer, and give his characters a lot of fun personality. Been a long time since I've read one, and he has written a few more, so I have some catching up to do. I went to Ireland about 10 years ago, and without a doubt, it was my favorite all time vacation. Fingal and Diedra get married, and they discuss having c Second Read: I've enjoyed this read a lot more than I did the first time. The Story is still very long, but it was a lot more enjoyable. I'm a big Patrick Taylor Fan. He is a delightful writer, and give his characters a lot of fun personality. Been a long time since I've read one, and he has written a few more, so I have some catching up to do. I went to Ireland about 10 years ago, and without a doubt, it was my favorite all time vacation. Fingal and Diedra get married, and they discuss having children. It is God's Country....I would love to go back. Barry and his wife are still together. Their medical practice is in place and is very very important. They do very very well. As I read, the countryside reminds me of the areas where we were on our trip. We didn't go to the Ulster area, but we did Dublin, Waterford, and several of the Counties. Wow, how wonderful. Highly Recommend. First Read: This is the 11th book in this series. It is really LONG. And swapping back and forth with Fingal and Diedra then forward that includes Barry, found it a little difficult to keep track of what is going on. This was not my favorite Patrick Taylor book. But as it is part of a series, one feels obligated to finish and the story needed to be told all the way through. I rated three stars because I like the new story lines being developed. I have high hopes for the future books. Just hope they come soon!

  6. 3 out of 5

    Janie

    Another good one. "Discovery . . . favours the prepared mind. And there are no better prepared minds in medicine than good nurses."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liselle

    This is the 11th book in the series but they aren't getting old. This one is just as good as the early ones and I look forward to #12!

  8. 3 out of 5

    Paula Dembeck

    As readers rejoin Fingal O’Reilley and his wife Kitty, the couple are in Dublin attending the thirtieth reunion of their 1936 medical school class at Trinity College. As they prepare for the dinner, the location of the event brings back memories of the past and Fingal recalls times when he was a surgeon on the naval ship HMS Warspite during the war. In this story, Patrick alternates two distinct time periods between the 1960s in Ballybucklebo and the early 1940s when he completed a three month s As readers rejoin Fingal O’Reilley and his wife Kitty, the couple are in Dublin attending the thirtieth reunion of their 1936 medical school class at Trinity College. As they prepare for the dinner, the location of the event brings back memories of the past and Fingal recalls times when he was a surgeon on the naval ship HMS Warspite during the war. In this story, Patrick alternates two distinct time periods between the 1960s in Ballybucklebo and the early 1940s when he completed a three month stint at the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar in Portsmouth. He had been given an opportunity to take a one month course in anesthesiology and extend that period to further his expertise in trauma surgery. During that time Fingal and his fiancée Deirdre Mawhinney married and experienced their first months of married life before she returned to Belfast and he returned to his ship. It was a period of brief happiness. During his course Fingal worked under the Chief of Surgery Sergeant Commander George Fraser, an arrogant, over confident and talented surgeon who was technically expert but had no compassion for his patients. He was often brusque and abusive with his co-workers, had definite ideas about the treatment of his patients and did not tolerate anyone questioning his decisions. He and Fingal come to a disagreement about the care of two patients and Fingal was forced to take steps that could have landed him in serious trouble. But Fingal managed to find creative ways to handle these problems and helped Flip Dennison a downed pilot who suffered horrible facial burns and Alf Hansen a talented man who was headed for a naval career and dreamed of being a gunner. Back to the sixties in Ballybucklebo, Fingal tries to help Ronald Fitzgerald a classmate who he noticed at the reunion was exhibiting worrying signs of a neurological disorder. But his offer is angrily refused as Fitzgerald accuses Fingal of intruding on his private life. Fitzgerald has never been an easy person and has no relatives or friends. Fingal and Kitty are worried about him. Barry Laverty is presently in a deep funk. He has received several letters from his fiancée Sue Nolan who is on a teacher exchange in France improving her French. But in each letter she mentions Jean Claude Hamou, her new friend who has been showing her the sights and with whom she has been sharing gourmet meals and visiting café’s. Barry knows he should trust Sue but after his experience with Patricia Spence who went off to Cambridge and found another romance, he is wary. Fingal’s friend John McNeil, the twenty-seventh Marquis of Buckleballybo is worried about his finances. He and his widowed sister Myrna have been poring over their expenses and are concerned about the future of the estate which will be subject to huge taxes when the Marquis dies. Fingal connects them with his brother Lars who begins to work with their solicitor and the National Trust to help them organize plans for the future and help them avoid crushing inheritance taxes. During this time Fingal is faced with two cases of women who are pregnant but have complications and knows he cannot manage them alone. Irene Beggs has a uterine fibroid and Lorna Kearney a case of RH incompatibility. It irritates him that he must ask for outside help but it reminds him his clinical knowledge is becoming dated and he must do something about that very soon. Jenny Bradley is engaged to be married and her future husband has been given a partnership in his law firm in Belfast. Jenny does not want to leave the practice in Ballybucklebo but it seems inevitable. Fingal interviews Dr. Nonie Stevenson as a replacement and she it appears she will fit in well. She passes Fingal’s test of liking roses and Labrador dogs although Barry has some reservations about her dislike of night call. He remembers as students that she could become bad tempered when she was tired. But the two partners decide to give her a three month probationary period to see how things work out. And what would one of these books be like without Donal Donnelly and his latest scheme. Donal has paid for stud services for his racing greyhound Bluebird but is concerned that Mary Donleavy’s Chihuahua got to his dog first. If that proves to be the case there will be some strange looking puppies born and he has no idea how he will sell them. But Donal always finds a creative solution to every problem and this time solves the dilemma by deciding his new puppies are exotic Woolamarroo herding dogs. The final chapters are heartbreaking as readers know from previous volumes how Fingal’s first marriage comes to an end. In the final pages, Fingal pulls up his car on Templemore Avenue and sobs, remembering his beloved Dierdre while the rain pours down around him. It was difficult to read and another reminder of the insanity of war. Taylor has combined a number of real life as well as fictional parts in this story. He did extensive research to get the details of the battles right and readers get a harrowing picture of what it was like for medical staff dealing with the wounded while bombs fell, guns hammered, soldiers screamed in pain and the medical staff raced to help them, sometimes to no avail. This book fills in much of Fingal O’Reilly’s past story about his work during World War II and his brief but ill-fated marriage to Deirdre. But I admit I am really missing Kinky and want to hear more about Barry and the last volumes have not focused much on them. Hopefully that will change with the next book.

  9. 3 out of 5

    Almira

    At first I wasn't really sure that I was going to enjoy this one, however, I finally came round and decided that it was just what the "doctor" ordered (sorry!) We have known Fingal through so many books, and his love "Kitty" who is now his wife, however, there has been mention of his first wife, Deirdre, in most of the previous books, so with the "real" introduction of Deirdre I was sort of jealous for Kitty. As is the case in so many series, authors start at the "present" and then we have to go At first I wasn't really sure that I was going to enjoy this one, however, I finally came round and decided that it was just what the "doctor" ordered (sorry!) We have known Fingal through so many books, and his love "Kitty" who is now his wife, however, there has been mention of his first wife, Deirdre, in most of the previous books, so with the "real" introduction of Deirdre I was sort of jealous for Kitty. As is the case in so many series, authors start at the "present" and then we have to go back to the "beginning" - sometimes it works, most of the time, I have found, it doesn't work. This is one of the "worked" times Patrick did a very thorough job of integrating both of Fingal's wives, so that we now understand how he became the man and doctor that he is. As in the past book, "An Irish Doctor in Peace and at War", Patrick has given background into actual events of WWII that he has used in both of these books. When I was reading the previous novel, the mention of the naval ship HMS Warspite was very well described, and what occurred during various battles - I then read the book "Franklin and Winston" (non-fiction about their relationship during WWII) and the Warspite was mentioned several times, so it was interesting to know to what Patrick wrote was pretty accurate. In reading this novel, I felt the same way - Patrick has taken great lengths to ensure that we "learn" something of what occurred during that "awful time of war". Fingal and his friends of Ballybuckebo are just as enjoyable as they have been throughout the entire series. Once again, Kinky, his housekeeper/cook, has provided several of her recipes at the conclusion of this book. I look forward to another book.

  10. 3 out of 5

    Susan

    Patrick Taylor never disappoints, nor does John Keating on the audio books! Taylor seamlessly weaves his tales of the characters' pasts with the "present." He is a teacher as well as a wonderful story teller and I look forward to any future stories--always loving and warmly entertaining. He reviews enough of the series history and details to jog the old memory. This also had interesting background of the British navy in the Mediterranean and Africa. Always interesting to see how medicine has pro Patrick Taylor never disappoints, nor does John Keating on the audio books! Taylor seamlessly weaves his tales of the characters' pasts with the "present." He is a teacher as well as a wonderful story teller and I look forward to any future stories--always loving and warmly entertaining. He reviews enough of the series history and details to jog the old memory. This also had interesting background of the British navy in the Mediterranean and Africa. Always interesting to see how medicine has progressed through the years.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alaine

    I fell in love with the characters of Ballybucklebo in the first installment of the Irish Doctor. I am always entertained by their exploits. The only reason I did not give this book 4 stars is the amount of naval/war information. For the first time I found myself skimming paragraphs. Although some may enjoy the information, it's just not my cup of tea. I highly anticipate the next "Irish Doctor" book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peg Lotvin

    I like this whole series though the titles are so similar I get confused as to whether I have read them or not. This contrasts O'Reilly's life during WWII as a Dr on a British naval ship and his first days as a newlywed with his later life as a GP in a tiny Irish village with his first love but second marriage. Read the earlier ones first.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary Boyd

    Love, love, love this series! Was so happy when I saw this latest book at the bookstore! It is as wonderful as the others! A must read for those who Dr. O'Reilly and all the other characters who reside in Ballybuckleboo!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Diane Davis

    I loved it. There were several times that I laughed so hard I had to hold my tummy. Patrick Taylor sure knows how to tell and Irish tale. And I love the Irish sayings and language.. Thank you Mr. Taylor.. Can't wait for the next episode.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Malani

    One of the best in the series. Taylor has done an excellent job with a tricky task.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    I love this series. But this book felt like it was trying to do too much, like it was designed to tie up loose ends. Still enjoyable but not compelling.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I love this entire series. This one provides much back story that fills in Fingal's WWII time and relationship with first wife, Deirdre.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This book lived up to my expectations of it, carrying on from the previous one, (An Irish Doctor in Peace and at War)in a satisfactory way. We learned about Fingal’s further experiences during the war as a medic aboard a warship in the early part of WW2, as well as events in mid sixties Ballybucklebo, following his marriage to Kitty and that of his housekeeper Kinky. The historical aspect, i.e. the 1940 time period, interested me more of the two covered in the book. I enjoyed reading about Finga This book lived up to my expectations of it, carrying on from the previous one, (An Irish Doctor in Peace and at War)in a satisfactory way. We learned about Fingal’s further experiences during the war as a medic aboard a warship in the early part of WW2, as well as events in mid sixties Ballybucklebo, following his marriage to Kitty and that of his housekeeper Kinky. The historical aspect, i.e. the 1940 time period, interested me more of the two covered in the book. I enjoyed reading about Fingal’s learning experiences in the Naval Hospital in Gosport, where he’d been sent to hone his anesthesia skills. As a retired nurse I find it interesting to read the history of the practices in medicine and surgery, and how they came to be. I felt like I was taking a walk through a medical museum at times when the author described various instruments, equipment and procedures. I’ve loved that aspect of all of this series that I’ve read so far. I’m not sure a non medical person reading all the detail would be as enthralled as I was. I was also entertained by the familiar sounding accounts of the arrogant god-surgeon throwing his weight around, true to how many surgeons in my experience operated, literally. Oddly enough, as I am not a fan of war or fighting of any kind, I also enjoyed reading about life aboard the Warspite in the heat of the battles it encountered in the Mediterranean. Again, I found it interesting and enlightening. All in all, an enjoyable read.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Patti

    Irish Country Doctor: In Peace and at War is #9 in the Irish Country Doctor Series. I have read and enjoyed each one and will continue to do so with every forthcoming adventure from the computer/pen of author Patrick Taylor. Those of us who have loved the adventures of Dr. O’Reilly, Dr. Laverty, Kitty, and every unique character that roams the village of Ballybucklebo, just can’t let go… It’s the warmth, the compassion, and the humor of Scottish village life that touches my heart. My favorite par Irish Country Doctor: In Peace and at War is #9 in the Irish Country Doctor Series. I have read and enjoyed each one and will continue to do so with every forthcoming adventure from the computer/pen of author Patrick Taylor. Those of us who have loved the adventures of Dr. O’Reilly, Dr. Laverty, Kitty, and every unique character that roams the village of Ballybucklebo, just can’t let go… It’s the warmth, the compassion, and the humor of Scottish village life that touches my heart. My favorite part of this one is finding out about Fingal’s first wife, Deirdre, and how they met and courted as the war interfered with their lives. Life aboard the ship for Dr. O’Reilly was complicated and busy. The chapters alternated with that time frame and thirty years later as newlyweds, Fingal and Kitty, enjoy their first year together. I loved reading both times, but I will repeat here my complaint from the last book that also switched time sequences: My only comment really won’t do any good at this point but given that this one alternated with a thirty-year jump in time, I had to read several paragraphs of a new chapter to find out where my mind needed to focus: present time, or thirty years prior. It would have helped if either the year was stated on the chapter title, or even better Mr. Publisher – change the font slightly, or make the past italic. Too late. And nobody asked me! But I still love the series and love catching up!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sharone Powell

    Though some books in the series are very enjoyable, this one is not one of them. Simply put, there is no story here, but a mere collection of anecdotes. Fundamentally, jumping from past to present between two stories (thought Taylor does it well) leaves us with two "wanna be" stories. But there is no inciting incident, conflict, and resolution (an easy example of that is book one in the series: Barry Lafferty needs to decide whether or not he likes to work with Fingal and living in Ballybucklebo Though some books in the series are very enjoyable, this one is not one of them. Simply put, there is no story here, but a mere collection of anecdotes. Fundamentally, jumping from past to present between two stories (thought Taylor does it well) leaves us with two "wanna be" stories. But there is no inciting incident, conflict, and resolution (an easy example of that is book one in the series: Barry Lafferty needs to decide whether or not he likes to work with Fingal and living in Ballybucklebo - leading to his experiences there - culminating with his decision to stay). For the series fans I'll say that we do get to meet Deidre, spend some time with her and Fingal until her death, then in the present, finally accompany Fingal as he lays the pain of her memory to rest. Ah, if only the story would have focused only on that, I would have liked it much more. Instead, Patrick Taylor tells us of sporadic patients, battles, and tricks by our master Ballybucklebo trickster, Donald Donnelly. Sadly it doesn't come together as a unit.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Best one yet! I would have given it five stars if it had been a little shorter and a little lighter on the military details. But over all, I really enjoyed it and feel that Patrick Taylor has at last fulfilled the promise that he shows less successfully in his other books. This book tells the story of Dr. Fingal O'Reilly's first love and marriage to Deirdre and continues with his life aboard the HMS Warspite on active duty in the Mediterranean during WWII. Interspersed with those events, are scen Best one yet! I would have given it five stars if it had been a little shorter and a little lighter on the military details. But over all, I really enjoyed it and feel that Patrick Taylor has at last fulfilled the promise that he shows less successfully in his other books. This book tells the story of Dr. Fingal O'Reilly's first love and marriage to Deirdre and continues with his life aboard the HMS Warspite on active duty in the Mediterranean during WWII. Interspersed with those events, are scenes from his ongoing practice in Ballybucklebo, Northern Ireland. This is done very well, by making seamless transitions between the two. In fact, one of my favorite chapters is the masquerade party during the 60's. Through-out, all references to that decade's music are spot-on and I also loved the poetic references in the war years scenes. They were poignant without being maudlin. The great greyhound/chihuahua scam is the perfect comic counterpoint to the heartache of war.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christine Irvin

    Doctor Fingal Flahertie O'Reilley is an Irish lad who served as a surgeon-lieutenant during WWII. He is engaged to his sweetheart, Dierdre, and wants to be able to marry her. But, there are difficulties to overcome in order to do so. Shortly after the wedding, he loses his beloved wife. He never really intended to remarry, but decades later, he reconnected with a previous girlfriend. The two end up getting married. The action in the book takes place at two different times. The reader learns about Doctor Fingal Flahertie O'Reilley is an Irish lad who served as a surgeon-lieutenant during WWII. He is engaged to his sweetheart, Dierdre, and wants to be able to marry her. But, there are difficulties to overcome in order to do so. Shortly after the wedding, he loses his beloved wife. He never really intended to remarry, but decades later, he reconnected with a previous girlfriend. The two end up getting married. The action in the book takes place at two different times. The reader learns about O'Reilly's life during the war and then alternately learns about his life many years later. The chapters alternate between the past and the present, weaving in a fair amount of history, as well as medical jargon, into the narrative.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cunning

    This book was hard to read with so much talk of the carnage of war, but at the same time it was the emotional reality of the story I loved. I'm glad so many questions were answered in this book that have been present since the very first book about Deidre. I think O'Reilly says it best himself when he describes her as a ghost. She is the ghost that lingers from the very first page of this series. I enjoyed finally getting to really meet the character, if only by going back into Fingal's past. And This book was hard to read with so much talk of the carnage of war, but at the same time it was the emotional reality of the story I loved. I'm glad so many questions were answered in this book that have been present since the very first book about Deidre. I think O'Reilly says it best himself when he describes her as a ghost. She is the ghost that lingers from the very first page of this series. I enjoyed finally getting to really meet the character, if only by going back into Fingal's past. And for all the heartwrenching moments, Donal Donelly's dog breeding scheme just made me laugh out loud! There's a little bit of everything in these books and that's why I love this series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Toni Laliberte

    I think this is my second favorite book, in the series. It was so good! I liked learning about Dr. O'Reilly's naval career and first marriage, his time during the war, all the exotic places he went to and just more about what shaped him, as a man and doctor. Lots of military references, jargon, lingo and history are in this book but it just fits with the storyline. Patrick Taylor is that good of a writer. War is ugly and he didn't hold back on that and I'm glad. Everything can't be good all the t I think this is my second favorite book, in the series. It was so good! I liked learning about Dr. O'Reilly's naval career and first marriage, his time during the war, all the exotic places he went to and just more about what shaped him, as a man and doctor. Lots of military references, jargon, lingo and history are in this book but it just fits with the storyline. Patrick Taylor is that good of a writer. War is ugly and he didn't hold back on that and I'm glad. Everything can't be good all the time. He sure did a lot of research for this book and you can tell. Very well written. On to book 11!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lynnette

    This entry in the Irish Country series alternates chapters between the "present" (sixties) and Dr. O'Reilly's days as a doctor in the Navy on Warspite. The "current" story continues, with Donal Donnelly up to his usual shenanigans and other characters being described in greater depth than in the books in which they were first introduced. Several questions about Dr. O'Reilly's past, especially his first wife, are answered in this installment.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I was very reluctant to read this book because it dealt with the death of Fingal's first wife during World War II. I would pick it up and then set it down for weeks at a time. I wish instead that I had just read it straight through. While his wife is killed, the book does not really dwell on it (in fact it occurs quite close to the end of the novel). Instead it is about their wartime romance.

  27. 3 out of 5

    Julie

    I had always wanted to read a book from the Irish Country Doctor series, and now I finally have. I listened to the audio version. It started very slow for me and I almost gave up a couple of times, but finally got into the rhythm of it and liked it. However, if I had been reading it rather than listening to it, I might well have abandoned it. Hearing the wonderful narration kept me going. I will listen to other books in this series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Payne

    Another delightful read of Patrick Taylor's. This story, of An Irish Doctor in Love and at Sea, tells the tale of his early love and marriage to Deirdre and his time at sea as a young Navy doctor on the Warspite. I feel like I am in Ireland when I read Patrick Taylor's books and it is a fun way to escape the daily chores of life!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Lawrence

    Playaway version provided perfect diversion during weight workouts and kitchen duty, as well as on a 4-mile trek before work several mornings. I wasn’t much interested at first, but Dr. O’Reilly and his cast grew on me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    This is the 10th in the "Irish Doctor" series. It is by far, the sweetest & most emotional of the books. We go back in time to WWII, when the young doctor was trying to marry his great love. Then, we go to Ulster in 1966. Just a wonderful & thoroughly enjoyable entry to a really great series.

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