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An Irish Country Love Story It’s the winter of 1967 and snow is on the ground in the colorful Irish village of Ballybucklebo, but the chilly weather can’t stop love from warming hearts all over the county. Not just the love between a man and woman, as with young doctor, Barry Laverty, and his fiancee Sue Nolan, who are making plans to start a new life together, but also the love of an ailing pensione It’s the winter of 1967 and snow is on the ground in the colorful Irish village of Ballybucklebo, but the chilly weather can’t stop love from warming hearts all over the county. Not just the love between a man and woman, as with young doctor, Barry Laverty, and his fiancee Sue Nolan, who are making plans to start a new life together, but also the love of an ailing pensioner for a faithful dog that's gone missing, the love of the local gentry for the great estate they are on verge of losing, or Doctor Fingal Flahertie O’Reilly’s deep and abiding love for his long-time home and practice. For decades, ever since the war, Number One Main Street, Ballybucklebo, has housed O’Reilly and his practice. In recent years, it has also opened its doors to O’Reilly’s wife, Barry Laverty, and a new addition to the practice, Doctor Nonie Stevens, a sultry and occasionally prickly young woman who may not be fitting in as well as she should. It is to Number One that patients young and old come when they need a doctor’s care, for everything from the measles to a rare and baffling blood disease. An unexpected turn of events threatens to drive O’Reilly from his home for good, unless the entire village can rally behind their doctor and prove that love really can conquer all. An Irish Country Love Story is a new and heartwarming installment in Patrick Taylor's beloved bestselling Irish Country series.

30 review for An Irish Country Love Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Well I liked this one more than the last two books which unfortunately were just back and forths between Fingal O"Reilly and when he met his first wife and lost her during the war. I think that Taylor should have just had one book looking book at his time and not having it go back and forth between present day and past. "An Irish Country Love Story" is the 11th book in this series, and it showcases the different stages of love that Taylor wishes to show in the villagers of Ballybucklebo, between Well I liked this one more than the last two books which unfortunately were just back and forths between Fingal O"Reilly and when he met his first wife and lost her during the war. I think that Taylor should have just had one book looking book at his time and not having it go back and forth between present day and past. "An Irish Country Love Story" is the 11th book in this series, and it showcases the different stages of love that Taylor wishes to show in the villagers of Ballybucklebo, between O"Reilly and his wife Kitty, between Barry and Sue Nolan, and even a dangerous sort of love (flirtation) between Barry and the new doctor that has been brought into the practice, Nonie. We even have a new love starting between O'Reilly's brother Lars and the Marquiis's sister Myrna. The book goes back to the setup of the earlier ones in the series with some focus being on O'Reilly and Barry. We get both of their third person POV's in this book. O'Reilly is a content married man now, but I am leery about O'Reilly thinking more about how to get Kitty to retire to work with him at a futuristic practice that would include many doctors and specialists. This book takes place in the winter of 1967 so I don't even know if that would be something that would even be thought of in Ireland at the time. The big plot point with O'Reilly in this book is the fact he may lose Number 1 (his home) after a lorry runs into his dining room. It seems that if the village allows the house to stay, they will rack up taxes if they build another road that will take the lorries and other heavier vehicles away from the village center. O'Reilly has another nemesis we have not heard about until this point, who is on the village council who wants to do whatever he can to make sure O'Reilly loses his home. Not going to lie, this whole thing was boring, and O'Reilly was being high handed with the Marquis and others. Eventually things are resolved, but it didn't make much sense to me so there you go. Barry is dealing with his fiancee Sue off doing a course in France for a couple of weeks. Barry being Barry at this point frets about things, but goes forward with trying to find a home for the two of them. A setback in Sue's family pushes the wedding date out, and I think Taylor was trying to make a conflict between Sue and Barry. All of a sudden Barry is concerned about having children and doesn't know if he wants them. How do you not have this conversation prior to marrying? Also it just reads as a roadblock that Taylor throws up to have some conflict in the book because the series is a bit samey at this point. Another point of conflict is the new doctor who apparently is all for having some "fun" with Barry. It was weird and vaguely upsetting since she didn't seem to care about Barry's fiancee Sue, who she had to have met at this point. I didn't like the new doctor and then Taylor manufactures a crisis with her. I hope she goes by the next book. The villagers are the villagers. Nothing much there at all to see. The writing is okay, but Taylor now just spits out medical facts as a patient is being treated. And the doctors continue to over explain things and it makes my eyes glaze. The flow was okay, I just have to say like many readers, this may have been a solid read, but ultimately boring. The setting of Ballybucklebo remains a favorite to me at least. I still re-read "An Irish Country Girl" and "An Irish Country Christmas" every year to get me in the holiday mood during Halloween and Christmas. The ending was okay. I do think that maybe Taylor should consider ending this series and skipping forward with Barry and Sue married with kids and O'Reilly looking to fully retire or something.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This is the latest edition in the Irish Country Doctor Series. The story is historical fiction, but Patrick Taylor based the story on his own life as a physician in Northern Ireland from the 1930s through the 1960s. The fictional town of Ballybucklebo and its physicians, Fingal O’Reilly and his new partner Barry Laverty, are the two key characters. The story is filled with fascinating characters that make up the town and countryside. This story takes place in January of 1967 and opens with Sue N This is the latest edition in the Irish Country Doctor Series. The story is historical fiction, but Patrick Taylor based the story on his own life as a physician in Northern Ireland from the 1930s through the 1960s. The fictional town of Ballybucklebo and its physicians, Fingal O’Reilly and his new partner Barry Laverty, are the two key characters. The story is filled with fascinating characters that make up the town and countryside. This story takes place in January of 1967 and opens with Sue Nolan saving the life of a sailor that has capsized his boat into the fridge bay water. Sue jumps into a nearby kayak and paddles out to save the man. Sue and Barry’s marriage also takes place in this story. One of my favorite characters is Kinky with her Cork accent. Kinky is the cook and housekeeper for O’Reilly. Kinky also provides the reader with an education on Irish food. The book is well written and is a delight to read. This is a feel-good book that leaves you with a smile. I started reading this series reading large print hardback books but switched to audiobooks. This series is definitely better read as an audiobook to obtain full enjoyment of the various Irish accents and the correct pronunciation of the Gaelic words. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is fourteen hours long. John Keating does an excellent job narrating the story. Keating is an Irish actor and award-winning audiobook narrator.

  3. 3 out of 5

    Diana

    I was so thrilled to get to this book in the series, we were finally finished with the flashbacks to Doctor O'Reilly's time in His Majesty's Navy during World War II. I understand trying to give us the background of the doctor and show how the character became the curmudgeon that fans of the series have grown to love but it's much nicer to be back to the current time, late 1960's, and see what the other characters are doing with their lives. In this one the practice is growing, Doctor Laverty is I was so thrilled to get to this book in the series, we were finally finished with the flashbacks to Doctor O'Reilly's time in His Majesty's Navy during World War II. I understand trying to give us the background of the doctor and show how the character became the curmudgeon that fans of the series have grown to love but it's much nicer to be back to the current time, late 1960's, and see what the other characters are doing with their lives. In this one the practice is growing, Doctor Laverty is a partner and looking to marry the local school teacher. They now have trainees in the practice and are working with other doctors in the area to help with being on call overnight. I love going back to Ballybucklebo and looking in on this interesting town.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Peg Lotvin

    Another in the long series about a country GP in a tiny Irish town. This one updates Barry and his girlfriend Sue Nolan until just before their marriage. More yummy sounding recipies from Kinky Auchenleck, and further adventures with Dr. O"Reilly keeping his adopted town running smoothly. Lovely quiet, low key reading.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I'm sure this is a fine little series, but I am going to abandon the book as it is not for me. I guess it is fair to call it heavy on old-fashioned sentiment.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fay Fawcett

    I think it is time Patrick Taylor gave up on this series. It was like he was just putting words on paper without following the original story. Boring. He spent several chapters on the search for a lost dog.Boy was that ever exciting. I could hardly put the book down. Sorry Patrick. Guess I am done with this series.

  7. 3 out of 5

    Connie

    I love Patrick Taylor and I love this particular series of books. The stories have a wonderful, small Irish village feel to them, and it makes the reader feel like they are part of the village life too.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Another in a series of delightful feel-good stories of a small town in Ireland. Pub date 10/04/16 I read this EARC courtesy of Edelweiss and the publisher

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anita Johnson

    This latest in the Irish Doctor series is a warm welcome back to Ballybucklebo, the little village with a big cast of quirky characters in Ulster County, in 1967. The last two books went back and forth from the 60's to when Dr. Fingal O'Reilly served as a naval surgeon in the Second World War. I was happy to be able to stay in one time frame and to read more about Fingal's coworker in his practice, Barry Laverty, and his fiancée, Sue Nolan. Thanks to my friend, Sandy, for directing me to this qu This latest in the Irish Doctor series is a warm welcome back to Ballybucklebo, the little village with a big cast of quirky characters in Ulster County, in 1967. The last two books went back and forth from the 60's to when Dr. Fingal O'Reilly served as a naval surgeon in the Second World War. I was happy to be able to stay in one time frame and to read more about Fingal's coworker in his practice, Barry Laverty, and his fiancée, Sue Nolan. Thanks to my friend, Sandy, for directing me to this quaint, charming village, several years ago.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Regina Spiker

    A sweet feel-good story set in a small village in Ireland - this is number 12 in the series.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Kathie Haffner

    Nothing happens in this book!!…I never would have finished it If I hadn't been trapped on a plane from Dublin to Toronto..Just plain BORING…

  12. 3 out of 5

    Sherry

    The 12th and latest addition to the Irish country Doctor series is indeed a love story, or any number of them as Dr. Barry Laverty and Sue Nolan plan their wedding, Fingal's lawyer brother Lars has been helping Sir John and Lady Myrna try to save part of the Ballybucklebo estate by signing much of it over to the National Trust, Barry's medical classmate Jack Mills is mooning over Fingal's protege, Helen Hewitt, who is finishing her medical school classes and sitting her exams, old Sonny Houston The 12th and latest addition to the Irish country Doctor series is indeed a love story, or any number of them as Dr. Barry Laverty and Sue Nolan plan their wedding, Fingal's lawyer brother Lars has been helping Sir John and Lady Myrna try to save part of the Ballybucklebo estate by signing much of it over to the National Trust, Barry's medical classmate Jack Mills is mooning over Fingal's protege, Helen Hewitt, who is finishing her medical school classes and sitting her exams, old Sonny Houston is seriously ill and worrying his wife Maggie. On top of it all, a lorrie driver going too fast crashes through the dining room of Number One Main Street, and the town council is considering widening the street and taking the good Doctor's house and surgery to do so. Well done. A very happy ending.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Almira

    Once again, Patrick has come up with another interesting look in the goings on of Dr's Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly and Barry Laverty in the village of Ballybucklebo. As the series started out "years" ago - it started with Barry Laverty's introduction to the village, the series has switched over to Fingal O'Reilly's story, which I have found much more interesting, with many historical highlights - so during this book, there was a great deal about Barry and his fiancé Sue, which I found rather uninte Once again, Patrick has come up with another interesting look in the goings on of Dr's Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly and Barry Laverty in the village of Ballybucklebo. As the series started out "years" ago - it started with Barry Laverty's introduction to the village, the series has switched over to Fingal O'Reilly's story, which I have found much more interesting, with many historical highlights - so during this book, there was a great deal about Barry and his fiancé Sue, which I found rather uninteresting. Fingal and Kitty have a major crisis when a lorry crashes through Number one, will this be the end of their life at Number One or will the council approve the needed repairs??????

  14. 3 out of 5

    Laurie

    I really enjoy all of Patrick Taylor's Irish Doctor series.

  15. 3 out of 5

    Tom Wascoe

    An excellent story in the Irish Country Doctor series. Reading Taylor is like wrapping yourself in a warm story comforter. He, as usual, mixes good story-telling, humor, warmth and Irish blarney in his novels. Well worth reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    It's always nice to re visit Balleybucklebo and see what everyone is up to :) I love the continuing story, the generations, the descriptions of the country, and the relationships. This series, these characters, remind me of Jan Karon's Mitford series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily Schmader

    Charming story, lovable characters, set in Ireland in the late 60's. I have not read the previous novels in the series, but I'd like to go back and read them now.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This was the least interesting in the series for me. It feels like he is (understandably) getting tired of his characters.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Paula Dembeck

    Patrick Taylor continues his long standing and popular series with book #11 in the collection. This novel picks up shortly after Xmas during the winter of 1967. Sue Nolan, Barry Laverty’s fiancée who was home for the holidays, has gone back to France to finish her six month teaching exchange and will return in March. Barry is anxious to have her back so they can continue with their wedding plans. During the cold stormy weather, several events begin to unfold in Ballybucklebo. Maggie Houston cont Patrick Taylor continues his long standing and popular series with book #11 in the collection. This novel picks up shortly after Xmas during the winter of 1967. Sue Nolan, Barry Laverty’s fiancée who was home for the holidays, has gone back to France to finish her six month teaching exchange and will return in March. Barry is anxious to have her back so they can continue with their wedding plans. During the cold stormy weather, several events begin to unfold in Ballybucklebo. Maggie Houston contacts Fingal, worried about her husband Sonny who is not well but refuses to see a doctor. Lately he has become very short tempered and yelled at her, behavior completely out of character. She’s frightened he will hit her and may even be losing his mind. When Fingal arrives to see Sonny, he learns that their beloved dog Jasper has gone missing, lost in the blizzard Fingal had to negotiate to see his patient. The dog is very dear to Sonny who found the puppy in a culvert sixteen years ago and brought him home. A search party is set up to hunt for the dog and the entire village participates. Nonie Stevenson the new doctor in the practice replacing Jenny Bradley is causing Barry concern. She is a first class physician with extra training in women’s health, but she is flirting with him every chance she gets, engineering him into compromising situations and making him very uncomfortable. She has such a deep need for sleep that it takes her two days to recover from one night of call. And when she does sleep, she seems to be completely out and it takes a lot to rouse her. Barry is thinking she may not be the ideal person to fill Jenny’s slot and is beginning to doubt that she will be a good fit for the practice. When a lorry negotiating a sharp turn skids into Fingal’s house at Number One Main Street, no one is injured and the surgery remains intact but there is a huge hole in Fingal’s dining room. The building is Georgian and requires planning permission to carry out renovations or major repairs. The Council are debating whether this is the time to widen the road and straighten out the dangerous turn, but this would require they expropriate Fingal’s property. Fingal has been in the house since 1938 when he joined old Dr. Flanagan in Ballybucklebo. When he came back from the war, Fingal bought the older doctor’s practice and has kept the place exactly as it is now. He has many memories tied up in the old house and is not going to give it up without a fight. But the alternative, a bypass around the village would be more expensive to build and the small village has limited funds. The Council is due to debate the matter and vote on a decision. Hubert Duran has a seat on Council and he and Fingal have been at loggerheads for years. Hubert has threatened Fingal in the past and Fingal is worried that Hubert will influence the vote which will decide whether his home is to be demolished. And there are impending matters of great concern to the McNeils, the local gentry. The family will be facing huge taxes when the marquis dies. He is trying to organize his affairs so that his sister Lady Myrna Ferguson and his son Sean will be able to live and farm on the estate after his death. Fingal’s older brother Lars is helping them with these complex legal matters and Myrna and Lars appear to be developing a close friendship. Fingal and Kitty are now almost sixty and beginning to feel their age. Fingal doesn’t have the stamina he used to and knows his clinical knowledge is becoming dated. He is worried that Kitty is working too hard at her nursing and wants her to slow down as well so they can spend more time together. He is wondering how he can organize things to make that happen. Jack Mills and Helen Hewitt continue their relationship although Jack is having difficulty playing second fiddle to her medical studies. There is also the problem of their religion. He is Protestant and she is Catholic. Could they ever work that out if things become more serious? The villagers of Ballybucklebo are like a large family filled with loveable characters, cherished pets and a few bad apples that make things difficult for the rest. Taylor describes it all against the background of the natural beauty of Ireland and fills the pages with dialogue that reflects the regional dialect, helpfully including a glossary for reference. Readers may find the long search for the dog Jasper goes far beyond their patience and the detailed history of the McNeils too drawn out. But the history of death taxes on estates is not only interesting but important to understand and appreciate the problem facing the marquis and his family. The series continues to be enjoyable as a quick light read with charming stories about its colorful characters. But as Taylor explores the nature of what makes a home and a community, he also gently urges readers to question rather than dismiss and condemn the things they see but cannot understand.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ron Chicaferro

    If you would like to read a well-written story that is free from murders, shootings and politics then grab a hold of any of the Patrick Taylor stories about his Irish Country doctors - - An Irish Country Love Story is well named - it's a love story involving the characters, the story, the times and the writing. All the books are stand-alone stories so don't worry about missing something - - they all involve the two main characters; Drs. O'Reilly and Laverty - - you'll love them, their loved ones If you would like to read a well-written story that is free from murders, shootings and politics then grab a hold of any of the Patrick Taylor stories about his Irish Country doctors - - An Irish Country Love Story is well named - it's a love story involving the characters, the story, the times and the writing. All the books are stand-alone stories so don't worry about missing something - - they all involve the two main characters; Drs. O'Reilly and Laverty - - you'll love them, their loved ones and the rest of the townspeople along with their usually touching and lovable individual stories. The stories are fascinating and the books are hard to put down - not because there is murder and mayhem on every page but because there isn't - the series is a wonderful on-going story with well-written characters. The books are written during the 1960's about life in Ireland - a real treat.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    “An Irish Country Love Story” is one of my favorites of the Irish country doctor ongoing series. I won’t spend a lot of time reviewing it as those of us who are fans of Patrick Taylor’s beloved series will read every one. I loved this one because it took the wonderful Dr. Barry Laverty and his lovely fiancé into the realm of romance that we’ve been waiting for. Finally, they are planning their wedding! We readers have been waiting forever it seems for Barry to truly be in love. To see Dr. O’Reil “An Irish Country Love Story” is one of my favorites of the Irish country doctor ongoing series. I won’t spend a lot of time reviewing it as those of us who are fans of Patrick Taylor’s beloved series will read every one. I loved this one because it took the wonderful Dr. Barry Laverty and his lovely fiancé into the realm of romance that we’ve been waiting for. Finally, they are planning their wedding! We readers have been waiting forever it seems for Barry to truly be in love. To see Dr. O’Reilly and his sweet bride, Kitty so happy makes this one a double romantic adventure. Loved the challenge of what will happen to Number One Main Street also. Looking for Jasper – heartwarming! The whole curtain thing - hilarious! And the rallying of all those citizens that love Dr. O’Reilly and come to his aid make this one extra special, indeed. It’s just full of warmth; I loved it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Number 11 in the "Irish Country" series. In this book, we are back to the standard basic structure of the series, namely, following the lives and complications of Drs. Fingal O'Reilly and Barry Laverty as they practice General Medicine in Ballybucklebo in Northern Ireland. No real surprises, even the obstacles, such as Sue Nolan's father's illness and the decision of the Borough Council, are predictable to readers of the series. However, that doesn't detract from the charm of the setting and the Number 11 in the "Irish Country" series. In this book, we are back to the standard basic structure of the series, namely, following the lives and complications of Drs. Fingal O'Reilly and Barry Laverty as they practice General Medicine in Ballybucklebo in Northern Ireland. No real surprises, even the obstacles, such as Sue Nolan's father's illness and the decision of the Borough Council, are predictable to readers of the series. However, that doesn't detract from the charm of the setting and the continuing characters...the very predictability is part of what make it comforting to read. My only real objection is the casual attitude towards pre-marital sex, especially the way it is condoned because "it's 1967, not 1867." Since when do morals have a sell-by date?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lina

    A visit with the residents of the Irish village of Ballybucklebo is always a delight. The love story referenced in the title isn't a romance but an ode to the people who make the village their home. In this installment Dr. O'Reilly's partner Barry is planning his wedding to Sue, the doctors are breaking in a new associate, and the villagers come together to search for a lost dog and also to try to save their beloved doctor's home when it is threatened with demolition to make way for a road proje A visit with the residents of the Irish village of Ballybucklebo is always a delight. The love story referenced in the title isn't a romance but an ode to the people who make the village their home. In this installment Dr. O'Reilly's partner Barry is planning his wedding to Sue, the doctors are breaking in a new associate, and the villagers come together to search for a lost dog and also to try to save their beloved doctor's home when it is threatened with demolition to make way for a road project. A nice diversion.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    In 1967, the Marquis of Ballybucklebo is turning over his estate to the National Trust because he cannot afford the confiscatory death duties. The town council is deciding whether to condemn Doctor Fingal Flaherty O’Reilly’ Georgian house, that also serves as his surgery, to straighten the road. Doctor Barry Laverty and his fiancee Sue Nolan are looking for a house to start their new life. The author has a gift for transporting readers to another time and place, but the dialogue – internal and e In 1967, the Marquis of Ballybucklebo is turning over his estate to the National Trust because he cannot afford the confiscatory death duties. The town council is deciding whether to condemn Doctor Fingal Flaherty O’Reilly’ Georgian house, that also serves as his surgery, to straighten the road. Doctor Barry Laverty and his fiancee Sue Nolan are looking for a house to start their new life. The author has a gift for transporting readers to another time and place, but the dialogue – internal and external – in this entry in the series is a tad saccharine.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Toni Laliberte

    Another great book, in this wonderful series! Like all the others it was heartwarming, full of likeable, believable characters and a charming Irish village, I'd love to visit. This is book 11 and it focuses on love and all of its forms and shapes. Dr. Laverty and the school teacher, Sue Nolan, the villagers love and respect, for Dr. O'Reilly, people and their pets, and a new love for a confirmed bachelor. Next up is book 12, the last in the series. Looking forward to reading it but also sad that Another great book, in this wonderful series! Like all the others it was heartwarming, full of likeable, believable characters and a charming Irish village, I'd love to visit. This is book 11 and it focuses on love and all of its forms and shapes. Dr. Laverty and the school teacher, Sue Nolan, the villagers love and respect, for Dr. O'Reilly, people and their pets, and a new love for a confirmed bachelor. Next up is book 12, the last in the series. Looking forward to reading it but also sad that it's going to end. Unless Patrick Taylor is writing another book? Please?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    Feeling a bit sad as I finish this book; the ending reads like the end of the series. I have loved escaping to the calm, simple, kind ways of Ballybucklebo, and will truly miss it if there are no more. I don't know what Patrick Taylor has in mind, but I would like to know how Barry and Sue get along as a married couple and whether Lars and Myrna continue their relationship. There are still more stories to tell!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lois Zollars

    Loved this book, but then I have read all of the Patrick Taylor books about the Irish Country Doctor series. It's great to meet up with "old friends" to see how they are progressing! If you haven't read the series, you're really missing out on some great entertainment! Mystery, romance, humor, drama- Patrick Taylor's books, and his beloved characters, have gone straight to my heart since reading his very first book!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    Awesome! If you are a fan of Patrick Taylor’s Irish Country Doctor series, you are going to love this one too! It has all of his usual characters, plenty of Ulster language and of course a great heart warming story to boot! He really knows how to wrap you into a different time period. I just love his books!😎

  29. 3 out of 5

    Dan Smith

    Fingal and Kitty might be losing their home due to a case of eminent domain... Barry is planning his wedding to Sue when she returns from France... Lars has been smitten with the Marquis sister... This is a wonderful story of love not only among the couples, but also the love of the village for its own.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hearn

    As usual, I enjoyed another story about the Wily O’Reilly and the in,ages of #1 Main Street, Ballybucklebo, Northern Ireland. I did find the “I love you”s between Barry Laverty and Sue Nolan got a bit wearisome but not to the point where it affected my enjoyment of the read. I look forward to trying some of Kinky’s recipes at the back of this book.

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